PUPPY SUPPLY

CHECK LIST

Crate(s)

Playpen or gates

Collar and leash

drag line (for indoor use)

cotton cord or rope and 2 bolt snaps (outdoor use) (alternative: 30' leash)

A chew deterrent (like Bitter Apple)

A pet stain neutralizer

2 bowls, ceramic or stainless

An easy to clean mat or bed

Assorted fun, plush toys

Assorted hard chew toys

Outdoor play toys like balls and rope toys

Entertaining food delivery devices (like tug-a-jug and kong balls)

A puppet

Soft dog treats (small)

Crunchy dog treats (small)

Patience and a sense of humor

INFANTS & DOGS

What to look for...

Dogs are not toys, teach respect!

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FACT: The #1 cause of facial disfigurement in children is dog bites!

 

FACT: 2 million children each year are bitten by dogs!

 

FACT: Children have a tendency to make direct eye contact with dogs and their eye-level is closer to a dog's eye-level. Dogs view direct eye contactas a challenge or threat, so BEWARE OF THE STARE!

 

HELPFUL TIPS:

1) Before bringing home your new baby, bring home from the hospital an article of clothing, stuffed animal or an item with your infant's smell on it to familiarize your dog.

2) For initial introduction of infant to dog, bring infant into the house and sit down, then bring dog into the room on leash.

3) NO unsupervised time between dog and children!

4) Try to give dog attention while infant is present and minimize attention when infant is absent so that your dog learns not to resent your child.

5) Dog should have a Child-Free Zone where he is guaranteed not to be disturbed (like his dog bed).

6) Beware of changes in relationship between child and dog when child begins to walk/crawl. If dog gets up and walks away from social interaction, don't let child follow. If dog is at rest don't let child approach without your permission. Respect your dog's space!

7) Dog's status should be beneath child's status, otherwise, according to pack law, dog may discipline child.DOG BODY LANGUAGE TO BEWARE OF:-Hard eyes, steady stare-Stiff posture-Tail tucked-Of course, snarling-Dog hovering over an object possessively.